The Perished – Review round up #1

Hey guys,

We’ve been absolutely blown away by the overall reactions coming in about The Perished since it’s world premiere at FrightFest on the 26th of August. We’ve had 10+ reviews and the majority of them have been overwhelmingly positive. The best ones really and deeply understood the subject matter and message of the film. We are so grateful to all the press who attended the premiere or reached out for a screener if they were unable to attend. More reviews coming very soon, but we’re all overwhelmingly proud.

Also will be doing a separate post with all podcast interviews/mentions/appearances since the premiere very soon too!

NIGHTMARISH CONJURINGS REVIEW

“There is nothing easy about watching THE PERISHED, but most of the best genre films are difficult to watch. This is a small indie film that makes you feel and think, and stands tall against a lot of the mindless drivel being spat out by Hollywood today. I can’t recommend it enough.” – Connor Fitzgerald Strader

http://www.nightmarishconjurings.com/2019/09/17/frightfest-review-the-perished/?fbclid=IwAR0VhdFHYCHRNKqzKAGcDATzuxoz_PZgvFHyg6hos9o8zzTk7fYs7QOgeFI

JUMP CUT ONLINE REVIEW – 4/5

“Paddy Murphy gets behind his podium and tells his story, forcing you to be a part of the conversation. It’s piercing atmosphere will leave as much of a cold feeling in the pit of your stomach as it will leave you scared. The film is a brilliant sophomoric effort and solidifies Murphy’s spot on the “directors to watch” list.” – Andrew Brooker

https://jumpcutonline.co.uk/frightfest-2019-the-perished/

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THE HOLLYWOOD NEWS REVIEW – 4/5 

“Slowly and deliberately, once the phantom screams begin, Murphy starts to season the story with other creepy elements. These elements gradually build in frequency and intensity to an almighty crescendo that screams horror. The climactic moments are like something straight out of Clive Barker’s mind and have a distinct Hellraiser tone to them.” – Kat Hughes

http://www.thehollywoodnews.com/2019/08/26/the-perished-review-dir-paddy-murphy-frightfest-2019/

BRITFLICKS.COM REVIEW

“You hope that films like this serve to shine a light of culpability on the people who wear church doctrine like a shield against legislative changes and the individual misery they continue to cause by wanting to deny a woman the right to do what she wants with her body.” – Stuart Wright

https://www.britflicks.com/blog/post/9161/THE-PERISHED-Arrow-Video-FrightFest-2019-Film-Review/

ENTERTAINMENT FOCUS REVIEW – 3.5/5

“Paddy Murphy shows plenty of promise with The Perished. You can see his skill as both a writer and a director, and his premise for the film is engaging and unsettling. Add to that the current landscape in the Republic of Ireland in the context of the subject matter here, and I’d go as far as to say Murphy has been very bold. It looks like Irish genre films have got a rising star to keep an eye on and I can’t wait to see what he does for his next film.” – Pip Ellwood-Hughes

https://www.entertainment-focus.com/film-section/frightfest/arrow-video-frightfest-2019-the-perished-review/

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KIM NEWMAN REVIEW

“Everyone apart from Sarah acts as if constrained by the conventions of their roles, but that’s precisely why her situation is so agonising – there’s a quiet horror in the moments when she foresees how conversations are going to play out with her useless boyfriend or narrow-minded mother but still has to go through with the argument.” – Kim Newman

https://johnnyalucard.com/2019/08/26/frightfest-review-the-perished/

PROJECTED FIGURES REVIEW

“Written and directed by Paddy Murphy (The Three Don’ts, 2017), The Perished is obviously made on a low budget, even if a similar economy does not always govern its dialogue, which is at times overlong, repetitive and a little on the banal side. Yet that mundanity offsets the bizarre nature of what is emerging in the house, and the film’s central issues – women’s bodies and choices in a country which has traditionally oppressed them – are compelling ones, here handled with welcome irrationality and irresolution.” – Anton Bitel

https://projectedfigures.com/2019/08/26/the-perished-2019/

THE KILLER SPOTLIGHT REVIEW – 4/5

“A great well written 1st attempt from a very passionate director Paddy Murphy with a solid team behind him to create a thoughtful drama about the rush decisions we make in life and the consequences that becomes of it.” – Jonathan Hughes

http://thekillerspotlight.com/2019/09/10/the-perished-review/

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SPLATTER CHATTER REVIEW

“It’s clear that Murphy is a talented filmmaker to watch, however. The film shows his skill at navigating depth, tone, and tension. He clearly knows what’s horrifying. It may just be that he’s taken on something too terrifying, or too grand, here, but you can feel the effort behind his storytelling. And with that kind of passion driving him, I’ll be first in line to see what comes next.” – Craig Ranallo

https://splatter-chatter.com/2019/09/17/31-by-31-challenge-4-the-perished-2019/amp/?__twitter_impression=true&fbclid=IwAR1Zv3QN0PQn3OaubNTiBeluZsSdVIQx9lPaJqnDoNQmSy_y9JFTtobTi_M

RODDERS REVIEWS REVIEW – 3.5/5

“Murphy never forgets where the true horror lies. It’s in bowing to shame and stigma, actions which ensure a horrific cycle will remain unbroken, and cause the same tragedies to repeat ad nauseam. It’s taking away someones choice, relinquishing them of their autonomy, and forcing them to go through with something they don’t want to. It’s in these moments that the film stays with you, long after the credits have rolled.”                    – James Rodders

https://roddersreviews.blogspot.com/2019/09/the-perished-2019.html

DEPTH IN FILM REVIEW – 3.5/5

“This is reminiscent of early Scorsese and Stanley Kubricks sense of dread this film is not to be missed. If you’re at Fright Fest I’d highly recommend seeing this one it’s one of the best films” – A.J Friar

https://depthinfilmreview.com/2019/08/26/the-perished-frighfest-2019-review

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HORROR CULT FILMS REVIEW – 3/5

“Murphy wisely sidesteps the question of when life begins by having the spirits act as a stand-in for stigma. He wants rural Ireland to face up to its history, so uses the location to draw a continuity between Sarah’s experiences and women from years, decades and centuries before. In this respect, The Perished isn’t pro-life or pro-choice but pro-empathy” – David. S. Smith

https://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/2019/08/frightfest-2019-day-5-a-good-witch-is-not-hard-to-find/

DAILY DEAD REVIEW – 2.5/5

“After Davet relays the unspectacular story of his coming out to his parents, he scolds Sarah for lighting a cigarette. “My parents might be okay with my sexuality,” he says, “but if they thought I was fu–ing smoking they’d crucify me!” It’s a playful line that captures the arbitrary rules by which households often operate, and suggests that, were things different, Sarah’s mother might have been merely anti-smoking rather than anti-choice.” – Sean McGeady

https://dailydead.com/frightfest-2019-review-the-perished-struggles-to-turn-goodwill-into-a-great-film/

NERDLY REVIEW – 2.5/5

The Perished is fresh, interesting and often chilling with its supernatural horror. What it lacks in the occasional substandard performance, it makes up for with the story itself and the use of macabre visuals. Not the most mind blowing ghost story I’ve seen but still one I had fun with, and found a lot to like about, The Perished should appease those in need of a decent spooky tale.” – Chris Cummings

https://www.nerdly.co.uk/2019/08/26/frightfest-2019-the-perished-review/

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THE FILM ERA REVIEW – 2.5/5

The Perished is still a decent film that tells the story it wants to tell, but it feels a little lackluster overall. Despite my lowish rating, this is a horror with a very strong message that many people will connect with. While it didn’t fully resonate with me, Murphy has made an intriguing contribution to a genre that thrives off of the horrors of real life.”       – Toni Stanger

https://thefilmera.com/2019/08/26/frightfest-2019-the-perished-review-an-emotionally-charged-blend-of-social-issues-and-horror/

 

Britflicks Podcast: The Perished

In a recent Britflicks.com podcast, Stuart Wright took the time to speak with Paddy Murphy, writer & director of The Perished about the film, ahead of it’s FrightFest premiere. The two talk about everything from the film’s inception, the development of the story, the production and the post-production. Check out the podcast below:

Stuart went on to write a piece on the Britflicks.com blog about Joe Lynch’s push to Paddy to make the film, which you can find here.

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Lisa Tyrrell as Rebecca Daly in The Perished

We keep saying it but it’s just incredible when we receive coverage and support for the film. It often seems like people care more on an international level about the film than they do domestically in Ireland. This could be due to the fact that the film does challenge some taboo topics, or because the referendum is fresh in everyones mind.

Whatever the case we’re so thankful to Stuart and all at Britflicks for giving us a platform to talk about the film. It means the world to us.

Celtic Badger Media.

Therapy from The Movie Crypt

I happen to be a great lover of Podcasts. My favourites include Shock Waves, Strong Language & Violent Scenes, Fear Initiative, Film Riot Podcast and of course, Adam Green, Joe Lynch and Dr. Arwen over on The Movie Crypt.

The Movie Crypt has been running for around 6 years and in that time it has become an incredible source of information and inspiration to film-makers around the globe. CBM are lucky enough to be proud supporters of the show over on Patreon, meaning that we get to ask questions as part of viewer mail and of course, the show’s fantastic Hollywood Therapy segment.

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Since we first developed the concept of The Perished, I’ve reached out a number of times through it’s production for advice and created somewhat of an ongoing saga around the film’s development & now, completion. It was nice to be able to kind of bookend the Hollywood Therapy journey in some way – while also getting some great advice about what to do next.

From the show;

JOE: I totally remember being outside The Phoenix [Artist Club] with Paddy that night and you know, like, that’s the thing when you go to FrightFest – everyone goes to The Phoenix afterwards. That’s just a moment where you’re not like, you’re not on – so to speak but everybody goes there and everyone is just having a good time and you go upstairs afterwards to just kind of… decompress, or get some air or whatever.

I remember having a conversation with Paddy and you know kind of just giving him, encouragement – you know, you can keep moving and to hear that he got his movie into FrightFest make’s me feel so happy for him and for everybody involved.

Honestly, this means so much given Joe Lynch (and of course, Adam Green’s) influence on the film both from it’s conceit through to it’s FrightFest premiere announcement. A huge thanks to Adam, Joe and of course Dr. Arwen for the advice, encouragement and support and for all the wonderful content they continue to create both on The Movie Crypt and beyond that with Films and their fantastic sitcom, Holliston.

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Joe Lynch’s new movie, Point Blank, just dropped on Netflix starring Anthony Mackie and Frank Grillo, while Adam’s most recent feature film, Victor Crowley is available online to buy on Ariescope.com and also via VOD streaming platforms like iTunes & Amazon. This excerpt comes from Episode 320, which see’s the dynamic trio interviewing genre icon, Sid Haig, star of Rob Zombies soon to be trilogy, House of 1000 Corpses, The Devils’ Rejects & Three from Hell – as well as classic horror films like Spider Baby and Galaxy of Terror.

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Check the episode out over here (or via Spotify, Google Podcasts etc.) and once again huge thanks (and massive congrats) to all the folks at The Movie Crypt who recently became part of the Fangoria podcasting network.

Read more about how Adam & Joe helped to make The Perished happen in our recent article about the film’s journey to it’s FrightFest premiere!

To quote Joe Lynch; Film-makers never give up!

The journey to The Perished’s FrightFest Premiere

Hey guys, Paddy from Celtic Badger Media here.

Just wanted to drop the news here that has been released elsewhere on sites like Dread Central & Bloody Disgusting. The Perished, our second feature film and my second as director, will have it’s WORLD PREMIERE at Arrow Video FrightFest on Monday the 26th of August 2019.

The day before my eldest daughters birthday, a fact that feels both completely coincidental and also, considering the film it is, entirely pre-destined.

I wanted to take the time to write a few (meaning several hundred) words about the film & the festival as both mean more to me than you could ever possibly imagine. I’m going to start with the festival as the film was borne out of it, so that feel’s like right order for this particular story.

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In 2014 my first short film, Ensnared, was premiering in Limerick, Ireland alongside a British short film called The Tour. The Tour, directed by Damon Rickard and produced by Annette Rickard, was also premiering somewhere else that day. FrightFest in London. I received a hilarious drunken intro video from Tour director Damon (who has since gone on to become an incredible friend) and star Jessica Cameron. Watching that video, my mind was made up. I needed to attend that festival, someday.

The following year I worked on a film in Scotland, directed by my incredibly talented friend Andy Stewart called Remnant. On this set, I met a talented stills photographer named Mike Shawcross, who has worked on many, many of my shoots since and would work on every film if geography didn’t get in the way. Mike agreed to come over to do stills on my short film Retribution in November of 2015.

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Mike did an incredible job and on set we became good friends. He asked me if I was going to FrightFest in August of the following year, or if I would be submitting the film. I said I hadn’t considered it. Well needless to say August 2016, I was there in Shepards Bush. Sadly, Retribution wasn’t but that’s fine; that’s the way short film submissions go.

I was immediately enamoured with the people, the festival & the organisers. I got to see My Father Die, 31 & Pet on the opening night and the festival ended with the highly emotional Train to Busan. I laughed through The Windmill Massacre with my seat buddy Sam & watched my newfound friend, fellow director Mark Logan, jump in his seat. I shared snacks with poster designer John Lynch and his wife, Kat. I also got to meet festival director Paul McEvoy, who I accidentally pissed off asking about my short film and then tapped a cigarette off. Smooth, I know.

Luckily by the end of the fest, we hugged and made up and since then Paul has been nothing but incredible to me.

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I committed right then and there to going again every year for the rest of my life. I also made the decision that some day, some how I would have a film grace that sacred showcase.

In 2017, FrightFest returned to it’s rightful place in Leicester Square, right in the heart of London’s West End. This year was bigger and better with Victory Crowley and Mayhem both playing. These were films by some of my favourite directors and getting to see them on stage introducing the film and at the bar later was a surreal experience. I accosted Joe Lynch [Mayhem, Everly, Wrong Turn 2, Netflix’s Point Blank] outside The Phoenix Artist Club where we would congregate until late into the night/morning.

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I told Joe that my first feature film, The Three Don’ts hadn’t been as successful as I had hoped and said that I was thinking of packing in film-making. Joe looked me dead in the eyes and said “Dude, you made a feature film. You should be fucking proud of yourself. That’s such a huge accomplishment. Most people only ever talk about that shit. You did it”. I had heard these words from friends, family and contemporaries, but it felt different coming from Joe, someone whose work I had admired for so long.

His next words were where The Perished’s journey began. He looked at me and said “You need to go home and start writing your next script. This shit isn’t like riding a bike. You will forget!”. Adam also gave some insight and words of wisdom and made me realise just how difficult the industry was, but never discouraged me from pursuing my dream. In fact over the next two years, their podcast The Movie Crypt would be a constant source of inspiration and outlet for questions and advice.

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I returned home to Ireland with renewed vigour. I sat down to write and in light of the discoveries of a mass baby grave in Tuam, my mind naturally wandered to that real life horror. I reached out to a close friend, Judd Tilyard, who helped with advice and feedback on the concept and by March of 2018, Celtic Badger Media were all onboard and committed to getting the project off the ground – especially my eternal co-conspirator and heater-lifemate, Barry Fahy.

After I began writing, news came out that a referendum would be held to repeal the 8th amendment, an article of our constitution that gave more rights to the unborn, than the mother. I was so incensed when I saw members of the Church commenting on this and stating that it was awful to kill (unborn) children. The hypocrisy that this organisation would have that standpoint in light of the Tuam discovery was the cornerstone on which the script was built and I received tons of advice from women who had been through the horrific event’s of dealing with an abortion. The stigma, the shame. The complete lack of support and empathy. This became I story Barry and I needed to tell. I also saw how communication around the referendum fell apart and most on either side just shouted at each other rather than trying to show any empathy and understand other’s perspectives. This was another formulaic and deep rooted message of the film. The breakdown of communication and the horrors it can unleash.

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In April 2018 we had the script locked down and shot a concept trailer for the film featuring many of the cast members who would go on to star in the real thing including Courtney McKeon, Stephen Tubridy and Noelle Clarke. We worked on pre-production tirelessly through the summer and FrightFest 2018 approached. I was struggling to go, as my money was tied up in the film, but somehow I managed to beg, borrow and steal my way back to Leicester Square.

In 2018 the festival opened with The Ranger; a female led, female directed film from the super talented Jenn Wexler, produced by the equally fantastic Heather Buckley. I actually reached out to Jenn while working on the pre-production materials for The Perished and she was kind enough to help out. I also briefly met Rob Galuzzo at the festival, one of the hosts of another favourite podcast of mine, Shock Waves.

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I was also lucky to encounter Jonathan Barkan, the editor in chief of Dread Central and over many drinks in The Phoenix we became fast friends. By 2018 I had gained even more FrightFest friends/family and the post fest blues were heavy, but knowing I was going home to shoot a film that I NEEDED to screen at that festival helped lift me out of it.

In September 2018 we began the process of table-reads, rehearsals, costume fittings, make up tests and all that fun stuff. Barry and his (then) girlfriend (now fiancee) Vachn were super supportive and helpful every step of the journey as we locked locations in and got the supplies we needed. We knew our window. We would be shooting from the 5th of October through to the 2nd of December.

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The day before we rolled camera’s my beloved pet/friend Stitch died in complications during labour. It was a sadly prophetic moment. I was crushed and to this day that pain hasn’t gone away. Anyone who has lost a pet that was their best friend will know how deeply that pain can hurt, but I couldn’t grieve there and then. I had to move on with the shoot. It was what Stitch would want I told myself.

Over the next 8 weeks the team would absolutely knock it out of the park. Courtney was not only playing Sarah, but working a full time job and also acting in a two person play called Tan in Limerick. Paul Fitzgerald who plays Davet in the film had given up his job at Live 95fm at the time to pursue acting more seriously and boy did he deliver. Fiach Kunz and Lisa Tyrrell both travelled down from Dublin for the shoot and were also leads in an incredibly heavy play that was running called Extremities. Conor Lambert travelled from way up north for his scenes, while Noelle Clarke travelled from way down south.

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Barry’s camera team consisting of Matthew Blayney [Additional Cinematography] and Martin Nee [Assistant Camera] really helped Barry in every aspect of his role as DOP. Bekki Tubridy was incredible at running her special effects make up department which consisted of herself, Vachn Gill, Marie Hourigan and Lynn O’ Doherty. This was not just a prosthetics job but a full on creature suit. Bekkis brother, Stephen, had played two creatures in one of my previous short films, An Beanshi and I knew he had the physicality and depth to bring that creature to life and he did not disappoint.

Mike Shawcross came on for two weekends to do stills and captured something truly incredible. His work was used in John Lynch’s original teaser poster and as the template for Christopher Shy’s official poster. He also had a team consisting of Matt Dillon & Robbie Milton, who were both fantastic. BTS Video duties were held by Graham Lillis for the first two weekends and then Niall O’ Hagan and Stephen McGuane for the remainder of the shoot and they all captured SOOOO much amazing footage. The BTS doc for this is gonna be awesome.

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Aaron Walsh who has worked on nearly every film I’ve made did an incredible job on DIT and had an assembly edit ready to go almost as we finished filming. He also cut the rough cut by February 2019. Absolute gem that he is. Marie Hourigan was assistant director but she wore many hats, helping Bekki with the makeup and Vachn with the catering among other duties.

It was brilliant to get to work with longtime Celtic Badger mainstay Brian O’ Regan in one of my favourite scenes in the film where he plays the “Portent of Doom” character ala films like Friday the 13th. Likewise it was fantastic to get to work with Tim Hourigan, even briefly, as he’s an actor I’ve wanted to work with for a long time. Nikki Fahy came on to help with Catering as required and we were hugely thankful for the food and hydration.

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My beautiful wife Kathy Murphy was our costumer, but so much more than that has been at my side through every element of this process and tried to be there for me when it was all getting too much. Kathy has had to put with a lot, as have my two daughters, when I’m in “Production Mode” but days out with them always manage to bring me back to reality and out of myself.

It was brilliant having Jon Barkan and his wonderful girlfriend, incredibly talented journalist Ariel Fisher on set, as well as Paul McEvoy. They gave some fantastic advice and helped shape some of the films later scenes. They were always willing to give suggestions and I was always more than willing to listen. Massimiliano Borghesi came onto the project as our sound mixer and designer, through another FrightFest connection, Stewart Sparke.

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I had attended the premiere of Stewarts first film at FrightFest 2016, The Creature Below and was lucky enough to also see the world premiere of his second feature, Book of Monsters at FrightFest 2018. I asked Stewart who did their (incredible) sound and he pointed me towards Max and I’m so glad he did.

From January 2019 myself, Barry, Aaron, Evan and Max worked on the film’s post production. Evan began composing and I would sit in with him and give feedback and advice but by the end of our time together, I was so proud of what he had achieved and think it’s his best score to date.  Barry helped with some additional editing to tidy the film up and Max just knocked it out of the park with the best sound we’ve ever had in a film to date. I hit the submit button on FrightFest 2019, tentative- but excited. I really felt that this was my best film to date and the film that most deserved to play at the Festival.

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When we received the news that the film had been selected to screen at FrightFest, I completely lost my shit. This was the festival that gave me the kick to go make the film in the first place.

This Festival means everything to me. This film also means everything to me. So together, they’re like peanut butter [Tubz] and chocolate. They go together perfectly. The fact that my FrightFest family and my Badger Family get to collide is incredible and I couldn’t be any happier. I’ve been shaking and smiling since the announcement yesterday and cannot wait for everyone to see the movie.

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If you’re still reading this ball of emotional word vomit, I commend you. Thanks for taking the time to and if you can, please check out our trailer for the film and our Facebook page. If you happen to be going to FrightFest, please come and check the film out. Thank you all so so much.

I’m gonna go back to my foetal position and shaking from the sheer joy of it all.

Much love,

Paddy Murphy

Writer/Director, The Perished.

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[Frightfest 2018 Reviews] Summer of ’84

Going into Frightfest 2018, I was beyond excited to see the new film from French Canadian director trio, RKSS – Road Kill Super Stars – Individually known as François Simard, Anouk Whissell & Yoann-Karl Whissell. The team was behind one of my favourite films of 2015, the phenomenal Turbo Kid. I won’t say that Summer of ’84, their follow up, is a bad film. For me, it just felt a little bit like they were losing their voice amid the studio system.

Summer of ’84 tells the story of four kids in your quintessential small American town, cycling around on bikes trying to solve mysteries. Think the “Hardy Boys” meets “Stranger Things” with a dolloping of “Rear Window” thrown in there for good measure. The leader of the group, Davey, is convinced that the cop that lives across the street from him is an infamous serial killer, but has absolutely no proof.

Davey enlists his friends, Curtis, Tommy and Dale to help in exposing the (suspected) child murderer, Officer Mackey – played with incredible charisma by the beyond talented Rich Sommer, who you may recognise as one of the FBI agents from the latest season of Orange is the New Black.

It works well as an examination of adults scepticism of kids, kids perception of adults and the dynamic and trust issues between the two. Where the film fell down for me was in its clumsy handling of the third act, which felt like ticking a bunch of boxes to suit the studio. I don’t want to give any spoilers away here so it’s hard to get into my reasoning, but I will say, if the film had ended in a certain scene where a ladder dropped into frame I would have been content. What came after felt shoehorned in and executed poorly – which I feel doesn’t necessarily reflect on the directors, but on the script.

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The film is accomplished from a directorial standpoint. It’s as clear here as in Turbo Kid that the trio of directors have a sense of style, but my fear here is that the substance isn’t quite on par with the style here. Equally, I have some issues with the cast. Individually, they are all fantastic but together something about their chemistry feels off – particularly, the relationship between Davey and his babysitter – which just seems a little seedy.

Summer of ’84 works best as a rumination on the idea of the killer next door – the friendly guy who smiles at you in the morning but murders teens at night. This is not a particularly new conceit though and while the “Rear Window through the eyes of a child” angle feels somewhat fresh, the buildup and overall climax left me wanting less… not more. In saying all of that, Summer of ’84 is a very solid movie and worth a watch if you enjoy coming of age movies or even serial killer movies.

If anything Summer of ’84 just gets me excited to see what RKSS do next…

Rating: 3.5/5

Summer of 84, produced by Brightlight Pictures & Gunpowder and Sky, is currently available on DVD/Blu-Ray and on VOD over on ShudderAmazon.

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Follow the film at https://www.facebook.com/summerof84movie/